Supplements archive

The Standard Bank Gallery runs an extensive Education Outreach Programme whereby learners are invited to attend lectures and workshops at the Gallery.  During the lectures learners are handed these extensively researched and professionally written worksheets which can be used in the exhibition or in the classroom or home. These Education Supplements double up as posters for classrooms

Candice Breitz: Extra!

Candice Breitz who was born in Johannesburg but now lives and works in Berlin, is an internationally renowned artist who has exhibited her photographs and video installations worldwide. Breitz's exhibition derives its title from her new work Extra (2011), a single-channel video as well as a series of photographs created on the set of the popular local soap opera, Generations. Breitz inserts herself into a number of actual scenes from the soap, sometimes subtly, sometimes awkwardly and absurdly, but always without judgement or easy explanation. Here she resonates as a conspicuously white presence amongst an otherwise black cast. The resulting images are simultaneously thought provoking and uncomfortably amusing - implicitly raising ...

Water, the [Delicate] Thread of Life

'Water, the [Delicate] Thread of Life', sets out to navigate a course through the many wonders and complexities of water and to challenge the way we think about and respond to one of the most precious substances on earth. This unique exhibition seeks to bring home just how fragile and tenuous life on earth would be without sustainable water resources. Through the eyes, minds and creative endeavours of South African artists, it shows how integral and fundamental water is to life. Water is indeed the delicate thread on which life depends. The exhibition, dedicated to "the lifeblood of all life forms on earth", comprises work by a host of artists, ...

Listening to Distant Thunder: The art of Peter Clarke

'Listening to Distant Thunder: The art of Peter Clarke', runs at the Standard Bank Gallery, Johannesburg, from 4 May - 2 July 2011. The exhibition is aimed at honouring Clarke's life, work and contribution to art and cultural development in South Africa. The exhibition is accompanied by a book of the same title, by curators Philippa Hobbs and Elizabeth Rankin. The culmination of seven years of extensive research, the book traces Clarke's evolution and is a comprehensive account of his art. Born in Simon's Town in 1929, Clarke's career spans six decades. After working in the Simon's Town dockyard for a number of years, he embarked on his career as ...

Wayne Barker: Super Boring

The concept for Wayne Barker's exhibition, 'Super Boring', was born at the private showing before the opening of the 2009 Venice Biennale, given to recognising an older generation of conceptual artists, including the American John Baldessari. Barker was in Venice to show on a fringe exhibition, 'I Linguaggi del Mondo: Languages of the World', curated by Vincenzo Sanfo. On the Grand Canal hung a banner declaring Baldessari's words from a 1971 artwork: "I will not make any more boring art." Barker is a colourful, provocative and rebellious persona and artist who lives a life of seemingly endless outrageous incidents. He and his work are anything but boring, lending an ironic ...

A Vigil of Departure: Louis Khehla Maqhubela, a retrospective 1960-20

'A Vigil of Departure', a retrospective of Louis Maqhubela, runs at the Standard Bank Gallery from 3 August to 18 September 2010. The thrust behind the exhibition and catalogue is to assess Louis Maqhubela's (1939- ) place in, and contribution to, the history of South African art. The intention is to remind the public of a great artist, to return Maqhubela from obscurity and to re-inscribe him into the history of art of this country. Maqhubela's name is strongly associated with the Polly Street Art Centre, where he studied from 1957-59. At a time of increasing apartheid restrictions, Polly Street, the first large-scale urban art centre in South Africa, emerged ...

Halakasha

'Halakasha!', a flagship exhibition celebrating the historic first FIFA World Cup™ in Africa, showcases a range of artworks dealing with the global phenomenon of soccer and the passion it evokes in Africa in particular. The exhibition's title, 'Halakasha!' is drawn from the traditional South African celebratory cry on a goal being scored. Designed to showcase the full spectrum of cultural manifestations of the love of soccer, the exhibition includes makarapas, vuvuzelas and commercially produced soccer merchandise. Other highlights include popular street art in the form of painted barber signs by Ghanaian and Congolese artists; a selection of posters from the official FIFA poster collection of commissioned prints by world renowned artists (© ...

Pieter Hugo

Pieter Hugo was born in Johannesburg in 1976 and is a self-taught photographer and filmmaker. He started taking pictures at the age of twelve, when his father bought him his first camera. He documents social issues globally but has a special interest in Africa and developing countries. On winning the 2007 Standard Bank Young Artist for Visual Art award, Hugo says: 'It means that photography is being recognised as an artistic medium in South Africa and this gives me great pleasure… It is refreshing that there is now the space where we can appreciate photographic images beyond the urgency of photojournalism.' Hugo was included in ReGeneration: 50 Photographers of Tomorrow, 2005-2025, an ...

Skin-to-Skin

The new South African multi-cultural identity, with its traumatic but unique history, was the inspiration for the exhibition Skin-to-Skin. The curator, Fiona Kirkwood, selected artists whose works are linked in some way to ideas about skin. However, their works do not just make reference to the trauma and irony of skin-colour classification. They explore various intriguing ideas linked to textile-making. Some are made from actual cloth, but others use techniques that remind us of fabric, thread, animal skin, body art or clothing. Concepts such as identity, stereotype, orientation and ethnicity appear and reappear in the creations by these artists, who come from all over the country: Lynda Ballen, Tamlin Blake, Leora ...

Cecil Skotnes

Of Norwegian-Canadian descent, Cecil Skotnes was born in 1926 in East London in a poor neighbourhood. He fought in World War II against fascism in Italy with South African troops, after which he stayed on to study painting in Florence. On returning to South Africa, Skotnes studied art at the University of the Witwatersrand from 1947 to 1950. He lived in Johannesburg from 1946, relocating to Cape Town in 1978. In 1963 Skotnes helped to establish the Amadlozi group. This group, which included Guiseppe Cattaneo, Cecily Sash, Sydney Kumalo and Edoardo Villa, sought to work at the intersection of African and European art. Skotnes first exhibited his prints on his ...

Nicholas Hlobo: Umtshotsho

In 2009 the Standard Bank Young Artist Award for Visual Art was bestowed on Nicholas Hlobo. Since 1981, the award has been made annually to those who have demonstrated exceptional ability in their field, and Hlobo was the 28th visual artist to be acclaimed through the award. On winning the award, he said, 'I am truly honoured to have been chosen and hope to give audiences something new and innovative'. A key element of the award is that winning artists are granted a national touring exhibition, with legs in all the major centres in South Africa. Hlobo's show, 'Umtshotsho', a sculptural installation, began its year-long tour at the National Arts Festival, ...

Alexis Preller: Africa, the Sun and Shadows

'Alexis Preller: Africa, the Sun and Shadows' runs at the Standard Bank Gallery from 13 October to 5 December 2009. A retrospective exhibition, it showcases the work of Alexis Preller (1911-1975). Preller was a major South African artist, whose unconventional form of expression was impossible to classify. In his art, he created a world of signs and symbols, shaping a private cosmology in which the myths of humankind are interconnected and interwoven. 'Alexis Preller: Africa, the Sun and Shadows' showcases a wide selection of the artist's work, as well as a number of artefacts, documents and photographs relevant to his life. A contribution to understanding Preller as one of South Africa's pre-eminent ...

Standard Bank Young Artists: 25 (SBYA 25)

'Standard Bank Young Artists: 25 (SBYA 25)', arriving fresh from the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, opens at the Standard Bank Gallery, Johannesburg, on 6 August 2009, running until 19 September. The exhibition celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Standard Bank Young Artist Award for the visual arts. The award is inextricably linked to the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown, which has run since 1974. The award is granted to emerging, relatively young South African artists who have demonstrated exceptional ability in their chosen field. The list of Young Artist Award winners from the past 25 years includes many of South Africa's most famous and astute creative individuals in the visual ...

Nontsikelelo ‘Lolo’ Veleko: Wonderland

'Wonderland', Nontsikelelo Veleko's Young Artist Award travelling exhibition, runs at the Standard Bank Gallery from 10 June to 18 July 2009. Veleko was the 2008 Standard Bank Young Artist for Visual Art, only the second photographer to win the award. These awards acknowledge emerging, relatively young South African artists who have displayed outstanding talent in their artistic endeavours. In 'Wonderland', she pursues familiar themes - people on the streets, fashion, graffiti and personal spaces. ...

Andrew Verster: Past/Present

Past/Present is a survey exhibition of works by the renowned artist, Andrew Verster. The exhibition opened at the National Festival of the Arts in Grahamstown in June 2008 and has travelled to several venues throughout the country. The show highlights work made by Verster between 1994 - the start of democracy in South Africa - and the present. It includes paintings, drawings, stage sets, costume designs and wax panels intended to show the diversity and ongoing creativity of one of the country's most prolific and respected artists. ...

Eduardo Villa: Moving Voices

At he age of 93, Eduardo Villa is probably the oldest working artist in South Africa. While he is probably best known for his large public steel sculpture. Eduardo Villa: Moving Voices reflects an often overlooked tradition of small-scale sculpture, showcasing a prolific collection of vibrant works which reflect the artist's delight in the vigour of life.   ...

Johannes Phokela: I like my neighbours

Johannes Phokela is renowned for his exquisitely painted manipulations of iconic images by European Old Masters, particularly those from the seventeenth century, like Rubens, Van Dyck, Breugel, Jacob de Gheyn and Caravaggio. "Most of my work," says Phokela, "is a contemporary take on Old Dutch and Flemish Masters where I take on what is perceived to be Europe's grandiose history of art as a medium to convey values and ideals represented within a global context of cultural elitism" (Dlamini, 2006). One striking feature of Phokela's satirical work is his use of a red nose, which appears every now and again in both his paintings and sculptures. He was inspired to ...

Judith Mason: A prospect of icons

Judith Mason was born in Pretoria in 1938. She studied at the University of the Witwatersrand in the 1950s, obtaining a BA Degree in Fine Art in 1960. Her first solo show was held in 1964. In the 1970s and 80s Mason was highly visible in the South African art world at a time when the country was isolated both politically and culturally from the rest of the world. Even so, she was chosen to represent South Africa at the Venice Biennale, and at international art fairs, like Art Basel. In the early 1990s Mason returned from living and teaching in Florence, Italy. At this time, her work became ...

Cecil Skotnes: A private view

Of Norwegian-Canadian descent, Cecil Skotnes was born in 1926 in East London in a poor neighbourhood. He fought in World War II against fascism in Italy with South African troops, after which he stayed on to study painting in Florence. On returning to South Africa, Skotnes studied art at the University of the Witwatersrand from 1947 to 1950. He lived in Johannesburg from 1946, relocating to Cape Town in 1978. In 1963 Skotnes helped to establish the Amadlozi group. This group, which included Guiseppe Cattaneo, Cecily Sash, Sydney Kumalo and Edoardo Villa, sought to work at the intersection of African and European art. Skotnes first exhibited his prints on his ...

Marlene Dumas: Intimate Relations

It will give viewers in-depth insight into Dumas's extraordinary oeuvre through a broad selection of her work, ranging from early conceptual pieces dating from her student years to her recent paintings and drawings dealing with contemporary global issues. The words 'Intimate Relations' from the title of this exhibition encapsulate the ideas and concerns Dumas has explored in her work during a career spanning thirty years or so. It raises questions about what intimate relations are and how these relations between people, places and objects are structured. It also probes the way we connect with one another, both personally and globally, and how we relate to art. More particularly, Dumas's work deals ...

Christine Dixie: Corporeal Prospects

Christine Dixie was born in Cape Town in 1966. She completed her undergraduate studies in fine art at the University of the Witwatersrand in 1988, before obtaining an Advanced Diploma in Fine Art in 1990. Dixie gained a Masters in Fine Art from the Michaelis School of Art, University of Cape Town, in 1993. She was a research fellow at the Ampersand Foundation in New York in 1998. ...

Churchill Madikida: Like Father Like Son?

Madikida was born in Butterworth in 1973 to a 'coloured' mother and a black father, who abandoned him. His life as a young person was challenging, to say the least. Not only was his family poor, but he also grew up with two stepfathers, one 'coloured' and the other Xhosa, neither of whom accepted him. To make matters worse, his Butterworth community did not embrace him either, because he was neither 'coloured,' nor black. 'I am just in between,' says Madikida. 'My community in Butterworth didn't accept me as black. They used to call me all these different names. I became very closed. Drawing became one of the ways ...

Karel Nel: Fugitive images from deep space.

Born in 1955, Karel Nel is a renowned South African artist who exhibits locally and abroad. He has taught Fine Art since 1980 at the University of the Witwatersrand, where he is now an Associate Professor, and was awarded a Fulbright placement at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1988. Nel has won numerous awards and commissions, and is represented in most art museums and public collections in South Africa, as well as in the collections of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington DC and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He lives and lectures in Johannesburg but spends six months of the year ...

Willem Boshoff: Word forms and language shapes 1975-2007

Willem Boshoff was born into a humble working class family in Vanderbijlpark in 1951. In the conservative world of an Afrikaner town, where it was commonplace for a boy to help his father around the workshop, Boshoff inherited his love of wood from his father, who was a master carpenter. But the relative harmony of his childhood years was shattered when, like all white males during apartheid, Boshoff was forced by the South African Defence Force to serve two years of military service after leaving school, then report for regular military camps. Boshoff refused to carry a rifl e, and came to reject all forms of violence and war, ...

Nandipha Mntambo: Faena and Leonie Marinovich: Not Me - Not

Faena includes cowhide sculptures, drawings constructed from cow hair stitched onto paper and a video that all demonstrate Mntambo's interest in the cow as a subject, the use of cowhide as a medium, and the dynamics of bullfighting.

Leonie Marinovich's photographic essay focuses on the issues HIV positive women face, and the way they live their lives.  ...

Making Way: Contemporary Art from South Africa and China

Making Way: Contemporary Art from South Africa and China, explores the ways in which contemporary artists based in South Africa and China engage with new paths of movement, with economic and cultural shifts, and with the rise of new regimes, new leaders and new social and urban spaces. The exhibition includes works in diverse media by internationally acclaimed Chinese artists, Wu Junyong, Chen Qiulin, Maleonn and Qin Ga and local artists Lebogang Rasethaba, Gerald Machona, Michael MacGarry and James Webb. Also on display are a number of videos of performance pieces by Doung Anwar Jahangeer, Hua Jiming, Qin Ga, Athi-Patra Ruga, Randolph Hartzenberg and Brent Meistre which embed the action ...

Justin Fiske - But Men Do Not See It:Kinetic works in the realm of simplicity

Justin Fiske weaves his fascination with mathematics, physics and simple mechanical principles together to create kinetic sculptures with a poetic touch and a Zen-like quality. Intended to evoke curiosity, his installations, manufactured from wood, metal, string and pebbles, encourage viewers to think about complexities of movement and the mechanics which make this visible. To read more please download the pdf. Exhibition dates
18 October - 7 December 2013 Time
Monday to Friday 8am - 4.30pm and Saturday 9am - 1pm Place
Standard Bank Gallery
Cnr Frederick and Harrison streets
Johannesburg ...

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